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DANIEL
// MY NAME IS DANIELAnd after years of dreaming I've sold everything I own and set off on the open road. I've made this site as a sort of photo journal of my travels. The map shows where I've been (red) and where I plan to go (white). But like all great plans, mine is open to the whims of the universe. The photos below are really just a few highlights from my journey (to see all the photos I've taken visit my flickr). And so, armed with little more than a backpack, a camera, and a dream, I now take the road less traveled by. So it goes.


. KEY PROPOSED DESTINATION DAY TRIP SHORT STAY (STAYED LESS THAN 10 DAYS) MEDIUM STAY (STAYED 10 TO 30 DAYS) LONG STAY (STAYED MORE THAN 30 DAYS)


MEXICO
SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE | MEXICO
SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE | MEXICO SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE | MEXICO
MORELIA | MEXICO ZACATECAS | MEXICO
DOLORES HIDALGO | MEXICO SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE | MEXICO DOLORES HIDALGO | MEXICO
ZACATECAS | MEXICO SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS | MEXICO
ZACATECAS | MEXICO TAXCO | MEXICO GUANAJUATO | MEXICO
SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE | MEXICO DOLORES HIDALGO | MEXICO SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS | MEXICO SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS | MEXICO GUANJUATO | MEXICO
CAMPECHE | MEXICO BACALAR | MEXICO CAMPECHE | MEXICO
REAL DE CATORCE | MEXICO REAL DE CATORCE | MEXICO
HIERVE EL AGUA | MEXICO HIERVE EL AGUA | MEXICO
HUASTECA POTOSINA | MEXICO HUASTECA POTOSINA | MEXICO
PLAYA DEL CARMEN | MEXICO MAZUNTE | MEXICO
SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE | MEXICO SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE | MEXICO SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE | MEXICO SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE | MEXICO SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE | MEXICO
HUASTECA POTOSINA | MEXICO HUASTECA POTOSINA | MEXICO
People sometimes ask, in all my travels, where has been my favorite place in the world? Well, I try not to play favorites but I'm often tempted to say Mexico. What I had assumed to be a great sprawling desert populated by little more than tumbleweeds and drug cartels turned out to be a magical realm of wonder and beauty, a land of seculed beaches and mysterious jungles, of ancient ruins and colonial capitals, of foods and colors and music, of breathtaking mountains and awe-inspiring canyons, of rivers and valleys and lovely preserved towns. And of course some of the most generous people on Earth. I had expected to stay only 20 days when I arrived. Instead I stayed six months. Mexico became my home for some small part of my life, Zacatecas in particular, what a magical place she is, but in all I traveled through 18 states, no small feat. I made a great many friends, saw a great many places, and made some of my best memories. So I suppose all I can say is, Viva Mexico!
GUATEMALA
LAKE ATITLAN | GUATEMALA
ANTIGUA | GUATEMALA ANTIGUA | GUATEMALA
ANTIGUA | GUATEMALA ANTIGUA | GUATEMALA CHICHICASTENANGO | GUATEMALA
LAKE ATITLAN | GUATEMALA LAKE ATITLAN | GUATEMALA IXIL | GUATEMALA IXIL | GUATEMALA IXIL | GUATEMALA
CHICHICASTENANGO | GUATEMALA CHICHICASTENANGO | GUATEMALA
IXIL | GUATEMALA IXIL | GUATEMALA
RIO DULCE | GUATEMALA RIO DULCE | GUATEMALA RIO DULCE | GUATEMALA
LAKE ATITLAN | GUATEMALA LAKE ATITLAN | GUATEMALA
CHICHICASTENANGO | GUATEMALA LAKE ATITLAN | GUATEMALA
SEMUC CHAMPEY | GUATEMALA SEMUC CHAMPEY | GUATEMALA
SEMUC CHAMPEY | GUATEMALA SEMUC CHAMPEY | GUATEMALA
SEMUC CHAMPEY | GUATEMALA SEMUC CHAMPEY | GUATEMALA
SEMUC CHAMPEY | GUATEMALA SEMUC CHAMPEY | GUATEMALA SEMUC CHAMPEY | GUATEMALA
On the heels of Mexico, I journeyed into Guatemala. Again, I had little as far as expectations, had planned only a little time here, and yet ended up staying nearly two and half months. I realize at this rate I'll be an old man before I make it all the way around the world. But Guatemala, the Mayan heart of the world, was worth it. I entered by boat, arriving at the Garifuna port town of Livingston on the Atlantic Coast. The Garifuna are descendants of shipwrecked slaves and populate a large stretch of the Central American coasts. From there I took a river boat into the jungles of Rio Dulce, coming out the otherside into the heartland of Guatemala. I visited the Mayan ruins of the north (some of the most important in Meso-America), the mountain villages of the east (still speaking their Mayan dialects), and the colonial towns of the south (some of the most beautiful in the Americas).
MESOAMERICA
TEOTIHUACAN | MEXICO
UXMAL | MEXICO BONAMPAK | MEXICO
TONINA | MEXICO LA QUEMADA | MEXICO
YAXCHILAN | MEXICO YAXCHILAN | MEXICO
BONAMPAK | MEXICO BONAMPAK | MEXICO CAHAL PECH | BELIZE
BONAMPAK | MEXICO TIKAL | MEXICO
MUSUEM OF ANTHROPOLOGY | MEXICO MUSUEM OF ANTHROPOLOGY | MEXICO
MUSUEM OF ANTHROPOLOGY | MEXICO MUSUEM OF ANTHROPOLOGY | MEXICO MUSUEM OF ANTHROPOLOGY | MEXICO
YAXCHILAN | MEXICO YAXCHILAN | MEXICO
Between Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and El Salvador, I visited 16 ancient cities, now all in ruins. Most were already in ruins centuries before the Europeans arrived, for reasons that are largely still a mystery. Most of the cities I visited were part of the great federation of Mayan states, but a few belonged to other kingdoms and other peoples. For some reason I had always assumed the Mayans were gone, that they had been all killed or assimiliated into modern society. I now realize, having lived with several different Mayan families (in several different countries), how foolish that notion had been. The truth is popular books are published in Mayan, entire movies are made in Mayan, radio stations are in Mayan. The cities of old may be gone, but the people, culture, and language lives on.
THE AMAZON RIVER
THE AMAZON
THE AMAZON THE AMAZON
THE AMAZON THE AMAZON
THE AMAZON THE AMAZON THE AMAZON
THE AMAZON THE AMAZON THE AMAZON
THE AMAZON THE AMAZON
THE AMAZON THE AMAZON THE AMAZON
THE AMAZON THE AMAZON
THE AMAZON THE AMAZON
THE AMAZON THE AMAZON
THE AMAZON THE AMAZON
I said before I'm sometimes tempted to claim Mexico as my favorite place in the world. The truth is, perhaps I should say the Amazon. I could probably write a book about my journeys here. While in Ecuador I heard a rumour of a cargo boat that made a six day journey through some of the most secluded parts of the Amazon jungle, the frontier between Ecuador and Peru. It left only every 20 days, and stopped in nearly every village along the way to buy bananas, roots, and animals to sell in the Amazonian city of Iquitos, the largest city on Earth without road connections to the outside world. Boat (or plane) was the only way in. I was sold. It took me two days by rickety bus just to get into the Ecuadorian jungle. Finally I reached the town of Coca, which is literally the end of the road. Coca sits on the Rio Napo, a tribuarty of the Amazon. From here I had to hopscotch for two days, paying locals to take me on their dugout canoes from river village to river village until I finally reached the Peruvian border.

I wasn't even sure if the rumoured cargo boat would be there or how long I'd have to await its return. As it turned out, it was already there, and it was leaving the following morning. I'd call this a moment of extreme fortune. Two Germans had been sitting in this tiny obscure jungle village for 15 days waiting for this boat. And what ever gods of Karma they had offended saw fit to make one of them so ill the night before depature, that in the end they couldn't go. It was safer for them to head two days back to Coca to seek medical attention than six days down river to Iquitos. So it goes.

Those six days were some of the most magical of my life. Sleeping on that tiny boat. Eating the same thing for every meal, boiled rice and a boiled banana. Bonding with the four other foreigners. Sharing space with a sea of locals in our overcrowded hammocks. Cringing as animals were dragged by their ears onto the ship. Smiling as we'd stop to buy piles of bananas on the river's edge, bananas guarded by little kids. It was the edge of the world and I will forever miss it.

That isolated river brought us to Iquitos, a magical and mysterious place unto itself, a city of floating markets, colonial dreams abandoned long ago to the hardships of the jungle, and ayahuasca shamans turning profits off New Age tourism. Travel was easier from Iquitos. Instead of tributaries I was now on the Amazon River herself, and some of the cargo ships were the size of cruise ships. It was three days journey to Colombia. And then another four to Manaus in Brazil, my final stop. In all I traveled 2200 miles of river by cargo boat through four countries. I stayed at a jungle lodge, visited an island of monkeys rescued from the markets, and ate fat white worms. All memories I'll never forget.
COSTA RICA
LA FORTUNA | COSTA RICA
CAHUITA | COSTA RICA CAHUITA | COSTA RICA
LA FORTUNA | COSTA RICA LA FORTUNA | COSTA RICA
LA FORTUNA | COSTA RICA LA FORTUNA | COSTA RICA
LA FORTUNA | COSTA RICA LA FORTUNA | COSTA RICA LA FORTUNA | COSTA RICA
LA FORTUNA | COSTA RICA LA FORTUNA | COSTA RICA LA FORTUNA | COSTA RICA
CAHUITA | COSTA RICA CAHUITA | COSTA RICA
SAN JOSE | COSTA RICA SAN JOSE | COSTA RICA
These photos don't neccesarily follow the order I traveled (in fact, not at all). But I felt Costa Rica fit here. One of the greenest nations on Earth, with no military, and some of the most amazing biodiversty to be found anywhere. I traveled one end of the country to the other, staying at the Garifuna town of Cahuita (during a hurricane no less), taking a break in the modern and pleasant capital city of San Jose, and perhaps my favorite part, hiking through a cloud forest to reach the top of a volcano lake. Hiking would be putting it mildly. It was mostly climbing and once the rains started it was mostly sliding. How my camera survived, I'll never know.
PANAMA
BOCAS DEL TORO | PANAMA
BOCAS DEL TORO | PANAMA BOCAS DEL TORO | PANAMA
BOCAS DEL TORO | PANAMA BOCAS DEL TORO | PANAMA
BOCAS DEL TORO | PANAMA PANAMA CITY | PANAMA
BOCAS DEL TORO | PANAMA BOCAS DEL TORO | PANAMA
BOCAS DEL TORO | PANAMA BOCAS DEL TORO | PANAMA
BOCAS DEL TORO | PANAMA BOCAS DEL TORO | PANAMA
PANAMA CITY | PANAMA PANAMA CITY | PANAMA PANAMA CITY | PANAMA
PANAMA CITY | PANAMA PANAMA CITY | PANAMA
PANAMA CITY | PANAMA PANAMA CITY | PANAMA
PANAMA CANAL | PANAMA PANAMA CANAL | PANAMA
Panama. I haven't much to say. It's a beautiful country. I spent half my time on the islands of Bocas Del Toro, home to pristine beaches, exotic animals, and cute towns. Aftewards I traveled by bus to Panama City, a modern metropolis with an old colonial heart. And of course, there's the Panama Canal.
PUERTO RICO
SAN JUAN | PUERTO RICO
SAN JUAN | PUERTO RICO SAN JUAN | PUERTO RICO
ARECIBO | PUERTO RICO CUEVA DEL INDIO | PUERTO RICO
SAN JUAN | PUERTO RICO SAN JUAN | PUERTO RICO SAN JUAN | PUERTO RICO
SAN JUAN | PUERTO RICO SAN JUAN | PUERTO RICO
SAN JUAN | PUERTO RICO SAN JUAN | PUERTO RICO SAN JUAN | PUERTO RICO
SUNSET | PUERTO RICO CUEVA DEL INDIO | PUERTO RICO
ARECIBO | PUERTO RICO SUNSET | PUERTO RICO
Puerto Rico, an island nation forever trapped between colonialism and statehood. Puerto Rico is technically a US terrority but the influences have gone both ways over the years. Puerto Ricans themselves haven't been able to decide whether they'd prefer independance or becoming the 51st state. Either way, this is one of the most beautiful islands in the Caribbean and her capital city of San Juan, one of the most beautiful colonial cities.
BELIZE
CAYE CAULKER | BELIZE
AGUACATE | BELIZE AGUACATE | BELIZE
AGUACATE | BELIZE AGUACATE | BELIZE
AGUACATE | BELIZE AGUACATE | BELIZE
HOPKINS | BELIZE HOPKINS | BELIZE HOPKINS | BELIZE
HOPKINS | BELIZE HOPKINS | BELIZE CAYE CAULKER | BELIZE PUNTA GORDA | BELIZE HOPKINS | BELIZE
HOPKINS | BELIZE PUNTA GORDA | BELIZE HOPKINS | BELIZE
SAN IGNACIO | BELIZE SAN IGNACIO | BELIZE
SAN PEDRO | BELIZE SAN PEDRO | BELIZE
PUNTA GORDA | BELIZE HOPKINS | BELIZE
SAN PEDRO | BELIZE SAN PEDRO | BELIZE
I found Belize to be one of the oddest places I've visited so far, though I can't say I know why. It's a tiny nation of not so many people, and yet it's comprised of a rainbow of groups. The Garifuna, the descendants of shipwrecked slaves, populate the coast (I stayed with a Garifuna family during a hurricane that I thought for a moment might just end my trip for good --- oddly a few months later I'd survive another hurricane, in another Garifuna town). Spanish speaking Latinos populate many of the towns. Two different Mayan groups dominate the southern jungles (I had the incredible opportunity to live with one of those Mayan families deep in the Belizean jungle). Agriculture in the country is dominated by blonde haired Mennonites dressed in their overalls, blue shirts, and straw hats. And the Chinese and Indians have carved out a sizable nitch as well. All I can say about Belize is... it's unbelizeable.
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
BAYAHIBE | DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
BAYAHIBE | DOMINICAN REPUBLIC SANTO DOMINGO | DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
BAYAHIBE | DOMINICAN REPUBLIC SANTO DOMINGO | DOMINICAN REPUBLIC SANTO DOMINGO | DOMINICAN REPUBLIC BAYAHIBE | DOMINICAN REPUBLIC PUNTA CANA | DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
SANTO DOMINGO | DOMINICAN REPUBLIC SANTO DOMINGO | DOMINICAN REPUBLIC SANTO DOMINGO | DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
I hadn't originally intended to visit the Dominican Republic, but I found such a cheap flight from Brazil that I couldn't pass up the opportunity. And from here I was able to take a ship to Puerto Rico and get another cheap flight to my home state of Indiana. By this time, I had backpacked from Argentina to Colombia (and everywhere in between) all by bus, then river boat to Brazil and I hadn't been home in two years. As far as the DR, it's a little rough around the edges but not without its charms. Santo Domingo, the capital, is actually the oldest European city in the New World, founded by the brother of Christopher Colombus himself.
HONDURAS
SUNSET | HONDURAS
CONCEPCION DE MARIA | HONDURAS CONCEPCION DE MARIA | HONDURAS
CONCEPCION DE MARIA | HONDURAS CONCEPCION DE MARIA | HONDURAS
CHOLUTECA | HONDURAS CHOLUTECA | HONDURAS
I wish I had more to say about Honduras but my time here was brief. That was partly because there was some discussion if the country had reached the status of civil war yet but mainly because there's a visa free union between Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua, which means a tourist is only given 90 days to visit them all, and I had used over 70 of my days in Guatemala already. But what I did see of Honduras, namely the tiny, remote, forgotten, mountain village of Concepcion de Maria was amazing. Honduras, I'll be back.
EL SALVADOR
PUERTA DEL DIABLO | EL SALVADOR
PUERTA DEL DIABLO  | EL SALVADOR PUERTA DEL DIABLO  | EL SALVADOR
PUERTA DEL DIABLO  | EL SALVADOR PUERTA DEL DIABLO  | EL SALVADOR
SUCHITOTO | EL SALVADOR SUCHITOTO | EL SALVADOR SUCHITOTO | EL SALVADOR
PANCHIMALCO | EL SALVADOR SUCHITOTO | EL SALVADOR
EL TRUNCO | EL SALVADOR EL TRUNCO | EL SALVADOR EL TRUNCO | EL SALVADOR
SUCHITOTO | EL SALVADOR SUCHITOTO | EL SALVADOR
If Honduras was a country possibily falling into civil war, El Salvador is a country recovering from one. The truth is, nearly every country in Central America has been wrecked by civil war at some point not so long ago (and when one finds out how many of those wars were supported by the US government, one starts to wonder if I shouldn't call this part of my trip the US War Crimes Tour). El Salvador, for all its troubled history, has a few gems hidden away, most notably for me the little colonial town of Suchitoto which sits on a hillside overlooking an amazing array of forests and lakes.
NICARAGUA
GRANADA | NICARAGUA
GRANADA | NICARAGUA GRANADA | NICARAGUA
GRANADA | NICARAGUA GRANADA | NICARAGUA
LEON | NICARAGUA GRANADA | NICARAGUA
GRANADA | NICARAGUA GRANADA | NICARAGUA GRANADA | NICARAGUA
GRANADA | NICARAGUA GRANADA | NICARAGUA LEON | NICARAGUA GRANADA | NICARAGUA GRANADA | NICARAGUA
GRANADA | NICARAGUA GRANADA | NICARAGUA
There was so much I wanted to do in Nicaragua, but couldn't because I had spent so much time in Guatemala. But I did spend all of my remaining Central America visa days here. I spent half my time in the colonial city of Granada and half the time in Leon. People will argue which is better. Interestingly, this is the first time I've ever had a problem at the border. I was detained for several hours, under the suspicion that I might be a journalist trying to sneak into the country. Unbenownest to me, foreign journalist had just been kicked out en masse as the national elections were only days away and the government didn't want any outside observers... umm.. observing. All my social media accounts were checked, I was interviewed several times, fun stuff.
COLOMBIA
SILVIA | COLOMBIA
SILVIA | COLOMBIA SILVIA | COLOMBIA
SILVIA | COLOMBIA SILVIA | COLOMBIA
IPIALES | COLOMBIA IPIALES | COLOMBIA
A terrible thing happened. I lost my camera in the Amazon river (a tribute to the gods of the river, I suppose). I lost nearly all my photos of Colombia and Ecuador. Colombia was amazing and her cities beautiful. At first I was apprehensive to enter Colombia, but the [disasterous] War on Drugs is largely over and FARC all but disbanded, so I risked it. And I'm forever glad I did. The people of Colombia were some of the most friendly I've ever met, and I had some great adventures here. What I lack in photos, I make up for in memories.
BRAZIL
OURO PRETO | BRAZIL
OURO PRETO | BRAZIL OURO PRETO | BRAZIL
OURO PRETO | BRAZIL SAN JOAO DEL REI | BRAZIL PARATY | BRAZIL
PARATY | BRAZIL PARATY | BRAZIL
OURO PRETO | BRAZIL OURO PRETO | BRAZIL OURO PRETO | BRAZIL
RIO DE JANEIRO | BRAZIL RIO DE JANEIRO | BRAZIL
RIO DE JANEIRO | BRAZIL RIO DE JANEIRO | BRAZIL RIO DE JANEIRO | BRAZIL
RIO DE JANEIRO | BRAZIL RIO DE JANEIRO | BRAZIL
Brazil! This is one of those countries that suprised me (though probably it shouldn't have). I spent 3 months here, using my tourist visa down to almost the day (and as a US citizen I had to get a proper visa... two actually... as the first one I lost when my passport fell into the Amazon River, but that's a story for another time). Brazil's colonial cities are world class. Her reaches along the Amazon otherworldly (as is her 1960s planned capital city of Brasilia though for different reasons). And Sao Paolo and Rio de Janeiro are two of the most well known cities in the world. I'm Sao Paolo all the way, even though I didn't include any photos here. Shame on me.
PERU
CAJAMARCA | PERU
LIMA | PERU KUELAP | PERU
TRUJILLO | PERU TRUJILLO | PERU TRUJILLO | PERU
KUELAP | PERU HUACA DE LA LUNA | PERU
CAJAMARCA | PERU CAJAMARCA | PERU
HUACA DEL ARCO IRIS | PERU CHAN CHAN | PERU CHAN CHAN | PERU
HUACA DE LA LUNA | PERU LIMA | PERU
KUELAP | PERU KUELAP | PERU KUELAP | PERU
Seventy days in Peru and I feel like I didn't even scratch the surface. I'm not sure if one ever could. Peru is legendary really, once the heart of the Incan Empire, once the seat of the Spanish Conquest in the New World, now a leader of South America. The Andes Mountains cut through Peru like a sword, with jungles to one side, deserts to the other, and a coast line that goes on for a thousand miles. Colonial cities, indigenous peoples, ancient ruins, unexplored jungles, amazing beaches, mountain retreats. I want to see it all.
ECUADOR
VILCABAMBA | ECUADOR
VILCABAMBA | ECUADOR OTAVALO | ECUADOR
VILCABAMBA | ECUADOR VILCABAMBA | ECUADOR
VILCABAMBA | ECUADOR VILCABAMBA | ECUADOR VILCABAMBA | ECUADOR
As I mentioned earlier, I lost nearly all my photos of Ecuador (and Colombia) when my camera fell in the Amazon River. Ecuador is the biggest loss. I went nearly everywhere, documented a dozen places, stayed with amazing families, even milked a cow. Cuenca is one of the most beautiful cities in South America. Quito one of the most interesting. And I have very little to show for it. Next time.
THE ANDES MOUNTAINS
THE ANDES MOUNTAINS
THE ANDES MOUNTAINS THE ANDES MOUNTAINS
THE ANDES MOUNTAINS THE ANDES MOUNTAINS
THE ANDES MOUNTAINS THE ANDES MOUNTAINS THE ANDES MOUNTAINS
THE ANDES MOUNTAINS THE ANDES MOUNTAINS
The Andes are the longest mountain range in the world, running some 4350 miles (7000km). I followed them for somewhere around 3700 miles (5900 km), starting in Bariloche, Argentina and finishing in Cali, Colombia. I crisscrossed from one side to the other more times than I can count, finding myself at times facing the Pacific ocean and other times the jungle filled interior of South America. The diversity of the mountains, from the temperate mountain woodlands of Chile and Argentina, to the desert highlands of Bolivia, to the Incan fortresses of Peru, and onward to the jungle valleys of Ecuador and Colombia was truly one of the most spiritual and awe-inspiring moments of my journey so far.

I spent time living with indigenous families who opened up their homes to me in Ecuador. In Peru I stayed at a mountaineering base camp turned alternative hostel perched at 11500 feet (3500m) above sea level. And I rode on the most fear-inducing buses imaginable, looping back and forth on barely paved roads lining the sides of ferocious, fog covered mountains where every rider is given a plastic bag as they board, for that moment when they will invariably hurl. But I wouldn't trade the experience in for anything in the world.
BOLIVIA
RURAL LANDSCAPE | BOLIVIA
SUCRE | BOLIVIA SUCRE | BOLIVIA
POTOSI | BOLIVIA POTOSI | BOLIVIA
SUCRE | BOLIVIA POTOSI | BOLIVIA POTOSI | BOLIVIA
RURAL LANDSCAPE | BOLIVIA RURAL LANDSCAPE | BOLIVIA
RURAL LANDSCAPE | BOLIVIA RURAL LANDSCAPE | BOLIVIA
I started my journey in Argentina, before crossing the Andes into Chile, and then crossing them again into Bolivia. However chaotic I had believed Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay to be, I was unprepared for Bolivia. Crossing that border was like crossing into another planet. And I loved every moment of it. Bolivia is equal parts mystery and beauty. Its a hard place to know, the land rugged and the people shy, and I wasn't here long enough to even pretend to understand the complexities of this landlocked nation sitting literally miles above sea level. But what I do know, is that I'll be back. That I know for sure.
URUGUAY
FORTALEZA DE SANTA TERESA | URUGUAY
FORTALEZA DE SANTA TERESA | URUGUAY COLONIA DEL SACRAMENTO | URUGUAY
MONTEVIDEO | URUGUAY MONTEVIDEO | URUGUAY MONTEVIDEO | URUGUAY
COLONIA DEL SACRAMENTO | URUGUAY COLONIA DEL SACRAMENTO | URUGUAY
MONTEVIDEO | URUGUAY MONTEVIDEO | URUGUAY
VALIZAS | URUGUAY VALIZAS | URUGUAY VALIZAS | URUGUAY VALIZAS | URUGUAY VALIZAS | URUGUAY
CABO POLONIO | URUGUAY PUNTA DEL DIABLO | URUGUAY CABO POLONIO | URUGUAY
Uruguay! I went to a Spanish school here but fell in love with this little country. Uruguay shares a lot in common with Argentina, who together, both stand out culturally from the rest of South America. That's partially because they recieved a lot of European immigration, so today the people are overwhelmingly Italian, Spanish, and German. Uruguay is home to some amazing colonial towns (Montevideo is great but Colonia Del Sacramento is world class), some exotic landscapes, and some of the most beautiful and peaceful seaside villages I've ever seen.
ARGENTINA
LA PAMPA | ARGENTINA
TANGO | ARGENTINA TANGO | ARGENTINA
BUENOS AIRES | ARGENTINA BUENOS AIRES | ARGENTINA BUENOS AIRES | ARGENTINA
BUENOS AIRES | ARGENTINA BUENOS AIRES | ARGENTINA BUENOS AIRES | ARGENTINA BUENOS AIRES | ARGENTINA BUENOS AIRES | ARGENTINA
PATAGONIA | ARGENTINA PATAGONIA | ARGENTINA PATAGONIA | ARGENTINA
MARA | ARGENTINA CAPYBARA | ARGENTINA
LA PAMPA | ARGENTINA LA PAMPA | ARGENTINA
I realize my website doesn't follow any particular order, but Argentina is where it all started. I still can't believe that Buenos Aires was my first stop. That was years ago now. I was nervous and inexperienced when I arrived, not sure if I'd survive months and years on the road through foreign countries. Perhaps that apprehension explains why I stayed nine months in Buenos Aires before continuing on (my plan was to backpack northward back to the US, all by bus, through all of Latin America, a feat I mostly accomplished). But I had other reasons to spend so much time in Buenos Aires. I was taking lessons, so I'd have some basic level of Spanish before pushing on. And also I simply fell in love with Buenos Aires, that great metropolis with one leg in Europe and the other in South America, a blend of two worlds, unique to both. Beautiful doors, funny looking animals (goat-sized guinea pigs?), and tango. And some of the best friendships of my life. That's Argentina for me.
CHILE
SANTIAGO | CHILE
VALPARAISO | CHILE SANTIAGO | CHILE
SANTIAGO | CHILE SANTIAGO | CHILE SANTIAGO | CHILE
CALDERA | CHILE SANTIAGO | CHILE
ATACAMA DESERT | CHILE ATACAMA DESERT | CHILE ATACAMA DESERT | CHILE
PUCON | CHILE ATACAMA DESERT | CHILE
BAHIA IGLESIA | CHILE ATACAMA DESERT | CHILE
The geography of Chile is amazingly diverse for such a skinny nation. I started in the mountains of the south, temperate and beautiful. By the time I reached the north, I was in desert, in fact one of the driest deserts on earth (and used by Nasa to simulate tests on the surface of Mars).
TAIWAN
TAIPEI | TAIWAN
TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN
TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN
TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN
TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN
TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN
TAIPEI | TAIWAN PENGHU ISLAND | TAIWAN
TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN
TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN
TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN TAIPEI | TAIWAN
WULAI | TAIWAN JIBEI ISLAND | TAIWAN
WULAI | TAIWAN WULAI | TAIWAN JIBEI ISLAND | TAIWAN
I really didn't know much about Taiwan before landing. I knew the history, I've read quite a few books about the Chinese Communist Revolution and Taiwan's own history is deeply intertwined there. I remembered that as a kid, my Atari was made in Taiwan. But modern Taiwan? I had no idea. It turned out to be a rather amazing little island nation. Taipei, the massive capital, was paradoxically very pleasant and peaceful and filled with some incredibly beautiful temples. The mountains at the heart of the island were enchanting (I went camping in them even) and the tiny island of Jibei, which sits between Taiwan and China was a tiny ocean paradise.
HONG KONG
HONG KONG | HONG KONG
HONG KONG | HONG KONG HONG KONG | HONG KONG HONG KONG | HONG KONG
HONG KONG | HONG KONG HONG KONG | HONG KONG
HONG KONG | HONG KONG HONG KONG | HONG KONG HONG KONG | HONG KONG
HONG KONG | HONG KONG HONG KONG | HONG KONG
HONG KONG | HONG KONG HONG KONG | HONG KONG
HONG KONG | HONG KONG HONG KONG | HONG KONG HONG KONG | HONG KONG
HONG KONG | HONG KONG HONG KONG | HONG KONG
HONG KONG | HONG KONG HONG KONG | HONG KONG HONG KONG | HONG KONG
Oh, Hong Kong. I stayed almost three months here. Probably too much time, but my plan to spend some of it exploring southern China was foiled when I couldn't get a Chinese Visa. Hong Kong makes an amazing first impression and it's an amazing city. But it's dense and it's crowded. And yet somehow I love it anyways.
THE PHILIPPINES
BAGUIO | PHILIPPINES
BANAUE | PHILIPPINES BANAUE | PHILIPPINES BANAUE | PHILIPPINES
BANAUE | PHILIPPINES BANAUE | PHILIPPINES
BANAUE | PHILIPPINES BANAUE | PHILIPPINES
BANAUE | PHILIPPINES BANAUE | PHILIPPINES
BANAUE | PHILIPPINES BANAUE | PHILIPPINES
BANAUE | PHILIPPINES BAGUIO | PHILIPPINES
VIGAN | PHILIPPINES VIGAN | PHILIPPINES VIGAN | PHILIPPINES
VIGAN | PHILIPPINES VIGAN | PHILIPPINES
The 2000 year old rice terraces of the Philippines are probably some of the most beautiful places I've ever been on earth. The rice farmed by hand, the villages carefully preserved, the land unspoiled. I'm not sure what to say. I also visited Vigan, the old Spanish colonial city located in the north. I do know what I can say about Vigan. It's bloody hot.
CANADA
QUEBEC CITY | QUEBEC | CANADA<br/>
Founded 1608. One of the oldest cities in North America and the only walled city north of Mexico.
MONTREAL | QUEBEC | CANADA<br/>
Founded 1642. Canada's second largest city and also second largest French-Speaking city in the world.
JACQUES CARTIER NATIONAL PARK | QUEBEC | CANADA JACQUES CARTIER NATIONAL PARK | QUEBEC | CANADA
JACQUES CARTIER NATIONAL PARK | QUEBEC | CANADA JACQUES CARTIER NATIONAL PARK | QUEBEC | CANADA
JACQUES CARTIER NATIONAL PARK | QUEBEC | CANADA<br/>
French speaking Squirrel. JACQUES CARTIER NATIONAL PARK | QUEBEC | CANADA<br/>
Maple taps collecting Maple Syrup.
AMTRAK | USA TO CANADA AMTRAK | USA TO CANADA AMTRAK | USA TO CANADA
Earlier I said Argentina was the start of my trip. That's a lie. It was Canada. On a brisk November morning of 2013, I had quit my job, left my apartment, sold all my things, and boarded an Amtrak train for French Canada. I never looked back. So it goes.
UNITED STATES
NEW YORK | UNITED STATES
WASHINGTON DC | UNITED STATES SANTA FE | UNITED STATES
SAN ANTONIO | UNITED STATES SAN DIEGO | UNITED STATES SAN DIEGO | UNITED STATES
CHICAGO | UNITED STATES CHICAGO | UNITED STATES
WASHINGTON DC | UNITED STATES KENTUCKY | UNITED STATES FLORIDA | UNITED STATES TEXAS | UNITED STATES PHILADELPHIA | UNITED STATES
GRAND CANYON | UNITED STATES
SHIPROCK | UNITED STATES GRAND CANYON | UNITED STATES
SANTA FE | UNITED STATES SANTA FE | UNITED STATES
SAN DIEGO | UNITED STATES
CALIFORNIA | UNITED STATES KENTUCKY | UNITED STATES
INDIANA | UNITED STATES INDIANA | UNITED STATES
INDIANA | UNITED STATES INDIANA | UNITED STATES
The United States, my homeland (that's me down at the bottom). I admit its a strange place, made stranger still now that I've seen other lands and have been away long enough to be on the outside looking in. There are paradoxes and mysteries here. Dreams are sometimes granted. Nightmares sometimes made. The highs are high and the lows are low. Boundless optimism, the driver of so much that makes America great, can be painfully clumsy when given so often to a lack of nuance. But it is what is. The US of A.


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